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Textbooks / Statistics / Understandable Statistics 9

Understandable Statistics 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Understandable Statistics | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780618949922 | Authors: Charles Henry Brase, Corrinne Pellillo Brase

Full solutions for Understandable Statistics | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780618949922

Understandable Statistics | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780618949922 | Authors: Charles Henry Brase, Corrinne Pellillo Brase

Understandable Statistics | 9th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Solutions by Chapter
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Textbook: Understandable Statistics
Edition: 9
Author: Charles Henry Brase, Corrinne Pellillo Brase
ISBN: 9780618949922

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 57. Understandable Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780618949922. Since problems from 57 chapters in Understandable Statistics have been answered, more than 30195 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Understandable Statistics, edition: 9. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Understandable Statistics were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 01/04/18, 09:09PM.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Acceptance region

    In hypothesis testing, a region in the sample space of the test statistic such that if the test statistic falls within it, the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. This terminology is used because rejection of H0 is always a strong conclusion and acceptance of H0 is generally a weak conclusion

  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Average run length, or ARL

    The average number of samples taken in a process monitoring or inspection scheme until the scheme signals that the process is operating at a level different from the level in which it began.

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Bivariate normal distribution

    The joint distribution of two normal random variables

  • Central composite design (CCD)

    A second-order response surface design in k variables consisting of a two-level factorial, 2k axial runs, and one or more center points. The two-level factorial portion of a CCD can be a fractional factorial design when k is large. The CCD is the most widely used design for itting a second-order model.

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conditional probability mass function

    The probability mass function of the conditional probability distribution of a discrete random variable.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Covariance

    A measure of association between two random variables obtained as the expected value of the product of the two random variables around their means; that is, Cov(X Y, ) [( )( )] =? ? E X Y ? ? X Y .

  • Defects-per-unit control chart

    See U chart

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • F-test

    Any test of signiicance involving the F distribution. The most common F-tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variances or standard deviations of two independent normal distributions, (2) testing hypotheses about treatment means or variance components in the analysis of variance, and (3) testing signiicance of regression or tests on subsets of parameters in a regression model.

  • Goodness of fit

    In general, the agreement of a set of observed values and a set of theoretical values that depend on some hypothesis. The term is often used in itting a theoretical distribution to a set of observations.

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