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Solutions for Chapter 15: Nonparametric Statistical Analysis

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827045 | Authors: Anthony J. Hayter

Full solutions for Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9781111827045

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827045 | Authors: Anthony J. Hayter

Solutions for Chapter 15: Nonparametric Statistical Analysis

Solutions for Chapter 15
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Textbook: Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists
Edition: 4
Author: Anthony J. Hayter
ISBN: 9781111827045

Chapter 15: Nonparametric Statistical Analysis includes 83 full step-by-step solutions. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781111827045. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 83 problems in chapter 15: Nonparametric Statistical Analysis have been answered, more than 11778 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, edition: 4.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k p - factorial experiment

    A fractional factorial experiment with k factors tested in a 2 ? p fraction with all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Axioms of probability

    A set of rules that probabilities deined on a sample space must follow. See Probability

  • Backward elimination

    A method of variable selection in regression that begins with all of the candidate regressor variables in the model and eliminates the insigniicant regressors one at a time until only signiicant regressors remain

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Continuous uniform random variable

    A continuous random variable with range of a inite interval and a constant probability density function.

  • Contour plot

    A two-dimensional graphic used for a bivariate probability density function that displays curves for which the probability density function is constant.

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Empirical model

    A model to relate a response to one or more regressors or factors that is developed from data obtained from the system.

  • Erlang random variable

    A continuous random variable that is the sum of a ixed number of independent, exponential random variables.

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Frequency distribution

    An arrangement of the frequencies of observations in a sample or population according to the values that the observations take on

  • Gamma random variable

    A random variable that generalizes an Erlang random variable to noninteger values of the parameter r

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

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