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Textbooks / Statistics / Mathematical Statistics with Applications 7

Mathematical Statistics with Applications 7th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780495110811 | Authors: Dennis Wackerly; William Mendenhall; Richard L. Scheaffer

Full solutions for Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780495110811

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780495110811 | Authors: Dennis Wackerly; William Mendenhall; Richard L. Scheaffer

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 32. Mathematical Statistics with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780495110811. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Mathematical Statistics with Applications were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 07/18/17, 08:07AM. Since problems from 32 chapters in Mathematical Statistics with Applications have been answered, more than 241649 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications , edition: 7.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • Conditional probability

    The probability of an event given that the random experiment produces an outcome in another event.

  • Conditional variance.

    The variance of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Contour plot

    A two-dimensional graphic used for a bivariate probability density function that displays curves for which the probability density function is constant.

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Cumulative distribution function

    For a random variable X, the function of X deined as PX x ( ) ? that is used to specify the probability distribution.

  • Defect concentration diagram

    A quality tool that graphically shows the location of defects on a part or in a process.

  • Defects-per-unit control chart

    See U chart

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Error propagation

    An analysis of how the variance of the random variable that represents that output of a system depends on the variances of the inputs. A formula exists when the output is a linear function of the inputs and the formula is simpliied if the inputs are assumed to be independent.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • Finite population correction factor

    A term in the formula for the variance of a hypergeometric random variable.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.