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Solutions for Chapter 18: Confidence Intervals for Proportions

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux

Full solutions for Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780321854018

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux

Solutions for Chapter 18: Confidence Intervals for Proportions

Solutions for Chapter 18
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Textbook: Stats Modeling the World
Edition: 4
Author: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux
ISBN: 9780321854018

Chapter 18: Confidence Intervals for Proportions includes 36 full step-by-step solutions. Since 36 problems in chapter 18: Confidence Intervals for Proportions have been answered, more than 19748 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Stats Modeling the World, edition: 4. Stats Modeling the World was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321854018. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k p - factorial experiment

    A fractional factorial experiment with k factors tested in a 2 ? p fraction with all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each

  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Adjusted R 2

    A variation of the R 2 statistic that compensates for the number of parameters in a regression model. Essentially, the adjustment is a penalty for increasing the number of parameters in the model. Alias. In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Categorical data

    Data consisting of counts or observations that can be classiied into categories. The categories may be descriptive.

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Comparative experiment

    An experiment in which the treatments (experimental conditions) that are to be studied are included in the experiment. The data from the experiment are used to evaluate the treatments.

  • Continuous distribution

    A probability distribution for a continuous random variable.

  • Counting techniques

    Formulas used to determine the number of elements in sample spaces and events.

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM)

    A control chart in which the point plotted at time t is the sum of the measured deviations from target for all statistics up to time t

  • Deming’s 14 points.

    A management philosophy promoted by W. Edwards Deming that emphasizes the importance of change and quality

  • Discrete random variable

    A random variable with a inite (or countably ininite) range.

  • Distribution function

    Another name for a cumulative distribution function.

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Error propagation

    An analysis of how the variance of the random variable that represents that output of a system depends on the variances of the inputs. A formula exists when the output is a linear function of the inputs and the formula is simpliied if the inputs are assumed to be independent.

  • Exhaustive

    A property of a collection of events that indicates that their union equals the sample space.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

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