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Solutions for Chapter 19: Chemistry: The Central Science 13th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

ISBN: 9780321910417

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown

Solutions for Chapter 19

Solutions for Chapter 19
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 13
Author: Theodore E. Brown
ISBN: 9780321910417

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. Since 231 problems in chapter 19 have been answered, more than 65945 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by Sieva Kozinsky and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417. Chapter 19 includes 231 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Aramid

    A polyaromatic amide; a polymer in which the monomer units are an aromatic diamine and an aromatic dicarboxylic acid

  • atmosphere (atm)

    A unit of pressure equal to 760 torr; 1 atm = 101.325 kPa. (Section 10.2) atom The smallest representative particle of an element. (Sections 1.1 and 2.1)

  • Beer’s law

    The light absorbed by a substance (A) equals the product of its extinction coefficient 1e2, the path length through which the light passes (b), and the molar concentration of the substance (c): A = ebc. (Section 14.2)

  • bond enthalpy

    The enthalpy change, ?H, required to break a particular bond when the substance is in the gas phase. (Section 8.8)

  • bond order.

    The difference between the numbers of electrons in bonding molecular orbitals and antibonding molecular orbitals, divided by two. (10.7)

  • Bredt’s rule

    A rule that states that it is not possible for a bridgehead carbon of a bicyclic system to possess a carbon carbon double bond if it involves a trans p bond being incorporated in a ring comprised of fewer than eight atoms.

  • Chiral center

    A tetrahedral atom, most commonly carbon, that is bonded to four different groups; also called a chirality center

  • condensation reaction

    A chemical reaction in which a small molecule (such as a molecule of water) is split out from between two reacting molecules. (Sections 12.6 and 22.8)

  • crystallization

    The process in which molecules, ions, or atoms come together to form a crystalline solid. (Section 13.2)

  • equilibrium constant

    The numerical value of the equilibrium-constant expression for a system at equilibrium. The equilibrium constant is most usually denoted by Kp for gas-phase systems or Kc for solution-phase systems. (Section 15.2)

  • hydration

    Solvation when the solvent is water. (Section 13.1)

  • isoelectric point (pI)

    For an amino acid, the specific pH at which the concentration of the zwitterionic form reaches its maximum value.

  • lipid bilayer

    The main fabricof cell membranes, assembled primarily fromphosphoglycerides.

  • nanomaterial

    A solid whose dimensions range from 1 to 100 nm and whose properties differ from those of a bulk material with the same composition. (Section 12.1)

  • nucleotide

    Compounds formed from a molecule of phosphoric acid, a sugar molecule, and an organic nitrogen base. Nucleotides form linear polymers called DNA and RNA, which are involved in protein synthesis and cell reproduction. (Section 24.10)

  • Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)

    A hydrocarbon containing two or more fused benzene rings

  • Tautomers

    Constitutional isomers in equilibrium with each other that differ in the location of a hydrogen atom and a double bond relative to a heteroatom, most commonly O, N, or S.

  • terminal alkynes

    Compounds with the following structure: R!C#C!H

  • vibrational excitation

    In IR spectroscopy, the energy of a photon is absorbed and temporarily stored as vibrational energy

  • Wittig reagent

    A reagent used to perform a Wittig reaction.

Textbook Survival Guides

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