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Solutions for Chapter 2: Molecular Representations

Organic Chemistry | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781118454312 | Authors: David R. Klein

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781118454312

Organic Chemistry | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781118454312 | Authors: David R. Klein

Solutions for Chapter 2: Molecular Representations

Solutions for Chapter 2
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Textbook: Organic Chemistry
Edition: 2
Author: David R. Klein
ISBN: 9781118454312

Summary of Chapter 2: Molecular Representations

A molecular representation reduces the dimensionality of a molecular structure into a chemically meaningful format that relays important chemical information. Molecular Formulas, Lewis Structures, Skeletal Structures

Chapter 2: Molecular Representations includes 71 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781118454312. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 2. Since 71 problems in chapter 2: Molecular Representations have been answered, more than 294057 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • alpha (a) rays.

    Helium ions with a positive charge of 12. (2.2)

  • aqueous solution.

    A solution in which the solvent is water. (4.1)

  • Aramid

    A polyaromatic amide; a polymer in which the monomer units are an aromatic diamine and an aromatic dicarboxylic acid

  • beta emission

    A nuclear decay process where a beta particle is emitted from the nucleus; also called beta decay. (Section 21.1)

  • chlorohydrin

    A compound containing a Cl group and a hydroxyl group (OH) on adjacent carbon atoms.

  • combination reaction.

    A reaction in which two or more substances combine to form a single product. (4.4)

  • covalent bond.

    A bond in which two electrons are shared by two atoms. (9.4)

  • curie

    A measure of radioactivity: 1 curie = 3.7 * 1010 nuclear disintegrations per second. (Section 21.4)

  • Fluid-mosaic model

    A biological membrane that consists of a phospholipid bilayer with proteins, carbohydrates, and other lipids on the surface and embedded in the bilayer

  • hydrophobic

    A nonpolar group that does not have favorable interactions with water.

  • indicator

    A substance added to a solution that changes color when the added solute has reacted with all the solute present in solution. The most common type of indicator is an acid–base indicator whose color changes as a function of pH. (Section 4.6)

  • J value

    When signal splitting occurs in 1H NMR spectroscopy, the distance (in hertz) between the individual peaks of a signal.

  • line spectrum

    A spectrum that contains radiation at only certain specific wavelengths. (Section 6.3)

  • Low-density lipoprotein (LDL)

    Plasma particles, density 1.02–1.06 g/mL, consisting of approximately 26% proteins, 50% cholesterol, 21% phospholipids, and 4% triglycerides.

  • metallic character

    The extent to which an element exhibits the physical and chemical properties characteristic of metals, for example, luster, malleability, ductility, and good thermal and electrical conductivity. (Section 7.6)

  • molal freezing-point-depression constant (Kf)

    A constant characteristic of a particular solvent that gives the decrease in freezing point as a function of solution molality: ?Tf = -Kf m. (Section 13.5)

  • molecular equation

    A chemical equation in which the formula for each substance is written without regard for whether it is an electrolyte or a nonelectrolyte. (Section 4.2)

  • Nucleoside

    A building block of nucleic acids, consisting of d-ribose or 2-deoxy-d-ribose bonded to a heterocyclic aromatic amine base by a b-N-glycosidic bond

  • Phospholipid

    A lipid containing glycerol esterifi ed with two molecules of fatty acid and one molecule of phosphoric acid.

  • Prochiral hydrogens

    Refers to two hydrogens bonded to a carbon atom. When a different atom replaces one or the other, the carbon becomes a chiral center. The hydrogens of the CH2 group of ethanol, for example, are prochiral. Replacing one of them by deuterium gives (R)-1-deuteroethanol; replacing the other gives (S)-1-deuteroethanol