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The three containers in Fig. 10–44 are filled with water

Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780130606204 | Authors: Douglas C. Giancoli ISBN: 9780130606204 3

Solution for problem 3Q Chapter 10

Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition

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Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780130606204 | Authors: Douglas C. Giancoli

Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition

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Problem 3Q

The three containers in Fig.  are filled with water to the same height and have the same surface area at the base; hence the water pressure, and the total force on the base of each, is the same. Yet the total weight of water is different for each. Explain this "hydrostatic paradox."

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 4

Let be the mass of water in the first container. As a result, the downward force of gravity on the water is. Only a force perpendicular to the walls, horizontal for the first container, enters the side walls. A net upward force of must be applied to keep the water at rest. This is the normal force exerted by the container's bottom. This upward force equals the pressure at the container's bottom multiplied by the container's area, and it is the same for all three containers.

Step 2 of 4

Chapter 10, Problem 3Q is Solved
Step 3 of 4

Textbook: Physics: Principles with Applications
Edition: 6
Author: Douglas C. Giancoli
ISBN: 9780130606204

This full solution covers the following key subjects: Water, base, height, explain, fig. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 35 chapters, and 3914 solutions. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 3Q from chapter: 10 was answered by , our top Physics solution expert on 03/03/17, 03:53PM. The answer to “?The three containers in Fig. are filled with water to the same height and have the same surface area at the base; hence the water pressure, and the total force on the base of each, is the same. Yet the total weight of water is different for each. Explain this "hydrostatic paradox."” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 52 words. Physics: Principles with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780130606204. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Physics: Principles with Applications, edition: 6. Since the solution to 3Q from 10 chapter was answered, more than 621 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer.

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The three containers in Fig. 10–44 are filled with water