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Solutions for Chapter 8: Chemistry: The Central Science 12th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

ISBN: 9780321696724

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Solutions for Chapter 8

Solutions for Chapter 8
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 12
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780321696724

Since 111 problems in chapter 8 have been answered, more than 131407 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 8 includes 111 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 12. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321696724. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • acceptor impurities.

    Impurities that can accept electrons from semiconductors. (21.3)

  • alpha (a) amino acid

    A compound containing a carboxylic acid group (COOH) as well as an amino group (NH2), both of which are attached to the same carbon atom.

  • Amino group

    A compound containing an sp3 -hybridized nitrogen atom bonded to one, two, or three carbon atoms

  • Baeyer-Villiger oxidation

    A reaction in which a ketone is treated with a peroxy acid and is converted into an ester via the insertion of an oxygen atom.

  • Brønsted acid.

    A substance capable of donating a proton. (4.3)

  • chelate effect

    The generally larger formation constants for polydentate ligands as compared with the corresponding monodentate ligands. (Section 23.3)

  • chemical equilibrium.

    A state in which the rates of the forward and reverse reactions are equal. (14.1)

  • Confi guration

    Refers to the arrangement of atoms about a stereocenter

  • crossed Claisen condensation

    A Claisen condensation reaction that occurs between different partners.

  • Energy diagram

    A graph showing the changes in energy that occur during a chemical reaction; energy is plotted on the vertical axis, and reaction progress is plotted on the horizontal axis. Also called a reaction coordinate diagram

  • Excited state

    A state of a system at higher energy than the ground state.

  • Fourier-transform NMR (FT-NMR)

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, a technique in which the sample is irradiated with a short pulse that covers the entire range of relevant rf frequencies.

  • Hydroboration-oxidation

    A method for converting an alkene to an alcohol. The alkene is treated with borane (BH3) to give a trialkylborane, which is then oxidized with alkaline hydrogen peroxide to give an alcohol

  • molecular geometry

    The arrangement in space of the atoms of a molecule. (Section 9.2)

  • Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    A spectroscopic technique that gives information about the number and types of atoms in a molecule, for example, hydrogens (1 H!NMR) and carbons (13C!NMR)

  • Phenyl group

    A group derived by removing an H from benzene; abbreviated C6H5! or Ph!.

  • phosphoglycerides

    Compounds that are very similar in structure to triglycerides, with the main difference being that one of the three fatty acid residues is replaced by a phosphoester group.

  • S (Section 3.3

    From the Latin, sinister, left; used in the R,S convention to show that the order of priority of groups on a chiral center is counterclockwise

  • Staggered conformation

    A conformation about a carbon-carbon single bond in which the atoms or groups on one carbon are as far apart as possible from atoms or groups on an adjacent carbon.

  • structural proteins

    Fibrous proteins that are used for their structural rigidity. Examples include a-keratins found in hair, nails, skin, feathers, and wool.

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