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Solutions for Chapter 7: Chemistry: The Central Science 12th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

ISBN: 9780321696724

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Solutions for Chapter 7

Solutions for Chapter 7
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 12
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780321696724

Since 115 problems in chapter 7 have been answered, more than 128997 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321696724. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 12. Chapter 7 includes 115 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • acid

    A substance that is able to donate a H+ ion (a proton) and, hence, increases the concentration of H+1aq2 when it dissolves in water. (Section 4.3)

  • activity

    The decay rate of a radioactive material, generally expressed as the number of disintegrations per unit time. (Section 21.4)

  • Aprotic solvent

    A solvent that cannot serve as a hydrogen-bond donor; nowhere in the molecule is there a hydrogen bonded to an atom of high electronegativity. Common aprotic solvents are dichloromethane, diethyl ether, and dimethyl sulfoxide

  • b-Elimination

    A reaction in which a molecule, such as HCl, HBr, HI, or HOH, is split out or eliminated from adjacent carbons

  • bond length

    The distance between the centers of two bonded atoms. (Section 8.3)

  • buffer capacity

    The amount of acid or base a buffer can neutralize before the pH begins to change appreciably. (Section 17.2)

  • C-Terminal amino acid

    The amino acid at the end of a polypeptide chain having the free !COOH group.

  • carbonyl group

    The C “O double bond, a characteristic feature of several organic functional groups, such as ketones and aldehydes. (Section 24.4)

  • diazotization

    The process of forming a diazonium salt by treating a primary amine with NaNO2 and HCl.

  • exo

    In Diels-Alder reactions that produce bicyclic structures, the positions that are anti to the larger bridge.

  • frontier orbital theory

    The analysis of a reaction using MO theory, where only the frontier orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) are considered.

  • fuel cell

    A voltaic cell that utilizes the oxidation of a conventional fuel, such as H2 or CH4, in the cell reaction. (Section 20.7)

  • functional group

    An atom or group of atoms that imparts characteristic chemical properties to an organic compound. (Section 24.1)

  • greenhouse gases

    Gases in an atmosphere that absorb and emit infrared radiation (radiant heat), “trapping” heat in the atmosphere. (Section 18.2)

  • hydration

    Solvation when the solvent is water. (Section 13.1)

  • hydroperoxide

    A compound with the structure R!O!O!H.

  • Prochiral hydrogens

    Refers to two hydrogens bonded to a carbon atom. When a different atom replaces one or the other, the carbon becomes a chiral center. The hydrogens of the CH2 group of ethanol, for example, are prochiral. Replacing one of them by deuterium gives (R)-1-deuteroethanol; replacing the other gives (S)-1-deuteroethanol

  • prostaglandins

    Lipids that contain 20 carbon atoms and are characterized by a five-membered ring with two side chains.

  • rate law

    An equation that relates the reaction rate to the concentrations of reactants (and sometimes of products also). (Section 14.3)

  • Steric hindrance

    The ability of groups, because of their size, to hinder access to a reaction site within a molecule.

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